Yashar
KAVOD/HONOR
AUGUST  2015

A Mussar Gem

Most positive traits are only relevant to a person as regards himself. However, in his conduct with his fellow, he is obligated to employ the opposite virtue. For example, to flee from honor is a precious quality. However, the reverse is true concerning others, as the Sages said: “Who is honored? One who honors others.” (Pirkei Avot 4:1)
– Rabbi Yisrael Salanter


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Register for the Kallah Now!

Nov. 12 – 15 at the Illinois Beach Resort in Zion, IL. Registration now open.


With Heart in Mind

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The Mussar Institute depends on the generosity of supporters. Please consider making a donation to honor someone or to remember a loved one.

Thank you to our generous donors:

  • David Abramson
  • Sammy Alzofon
  • Rosalyn Blumenthal, in memory of Fred and Gerda Blumenthal
  • Bonnie Houghton
  • Felice Joyce
  • Joanne Lancin, in memory of Celia Spurr
  • Cyndee Levy
  • Ellen Miller
  • Gary Shaffer
  • Betsy Teitell, in honor of Pam Rollins for her guidance, training and generosity
  • Efrat Zarren-Zohar, in memory of her parents, Bennett and Ellen Zarren

Membership

TMI Membership for 2015–2016 is now open. Support TMI and take advantage of special offerings for members. Click here for more information. 

Donations are gratefully accepted.

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THE MUSSAR INSTITUTE

For further information on The Mussar Institute, visit www.MussarInstitute.org
Email address: info@mussarinstitute.org
Phone: 305-610-7260

Alan MorinisThrough a Mussar Lens: To Rebuke With Honor

I have recently been fascinated to learn how the brain functions. A student of Mussar—and anyone who wants to realize their personal potential—needs to understand how the brain works. To take an example that applies to many of us, a person dealing with anger is operating in the dark unless he or she understands that anger is a product of the limbic brain, and the neuronal pathways along which anger flies through the brain are among the most hardwired. Anger moves through the brain at supersonic speed, in contrast to conscious, deliberate thought, which creeps through the brain at a much slower speed.

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balanceKallah XIII: Balance and Honor

When I was first introduced to Mussar practice at a talk by Alan Morinis, one of the phrases he used really resonated with me: “bringing balance to our souls.”  This phrase was also part of a prayer suggested to be used at the end of each va’ad (group) meeting. I love this phrase because it represents so much more than just “work-life balance.” A balanced soul is not a teeter totter that I am trying to keep in a fixed middle position, with the tension of trying to keep it from going up or down on either end. It is more fluid. There is breathing room for my time and energy to sometimes be invested in my job, and other times in my family, and other times in my other job, and other times in another part of my family. If my soul is in balance, then I have an easier time navigating through these hills and valleys, riding or diving into these waves.

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The Goldens and the Vogels in AmersterdamKavod in Action: A Trip to Amsterdam

Mussar study and practice have transformed my life, offering me more than I ever could have imagined. But I had not anticipated that its benefits would extend to (almost) halfway around the world. The seeds for this amazing experience took place at the 2014 Kallah, where I met Henri and Marga Vogel from Amsterdam.

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Profound Impact of the Mussar Practice Retreat

By Harriet Cohen

A frequently heard term in education, business and technology is “disruptive innovation”— a change that challenges the status quo or improves a product in unplanned ways. And the Mussar Practice Retreat (held in Maryland from May 31 to June 3) served as just such a disruptive experience for me. It provided the needed change in my daily routine to confront the ways that the mundane tasks of my life (i.e., the busyness of doing) constrained my relationship with the Divine, other people and my Higher Self. This interruption in my thoughts and actions allowed me to recognize the discrepancy between my articulated values and beliefs in walking a sacred path and the reality of how I spend my time and resources.  

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Bulletin Board

Rabbis at the retreatRabbis' Retreat

TMI’s first Derekh HaNefesh program for rabbis of all denominations began in January and culminated in a four-day retreat in July at the Brandeis-Bardin Institute outside Los Angeles. Eighteen rabbis participated in the program. The retreat was led by Avi Fertig, David Jaffe and Efrat Zarren-Zohar, with contributions from Alan Morinis. Judith Edelstein and Pam Wax served as va'ad leaders.

A new cohort will begin in January 2016; registration information will follow soon.


businessmen bowingPractice Corner

The Torah provides us with many models of people bowing to one another as a sign of respect. Moses bows to Yitro (Exodus / Shemot 18:7). Avraham bows to his guests (Genesis / Beresihit 18:2). Yaakov bows to Esav (Genesis / Beresihit 33:3). And so on.

Whenever you meet another neshama (holy soul), in recognition of the holiness of that spiritual being (irrespective of their earthly merits or demerits), make a practice to bow to them. It will be enough to dip your head, or even to bow in your imagination, because it is not the extent of the prostration that measures the kavod / honor you show another, but the intention in your heart to recognize that this one, too, is a holy soul and so worthy of honor.


Newsletter Home

Through a Mussar Lens: To Rebuke With Honor – by Alan Morinis

Kallah XIII: Balance and Honor – by Judith Golden

Kavod in Action: A Trip to Amsterdam – by Judith Edelstein

Profound Impact of the Mussar Practice Retreat – by Harriet Cohen


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Copyright 2015 © The Mussar Institute

A Mussar Gem

Most positive traits are only relevant to a person as regards himself. However, in his conduct with his fellow, he is obligated to employ the opposite virtue. For example, to flee from honor is a precious quality. However, the reverse is true concerning others, as the Sages said: “Who is honored? One who honors others.” (Pirkei Avot 4:1)
– Rabbi Yisrael Salanter


Chevrah members access the HomeSite here.


Register for the Kallah Now!

Nov. 12 – 15 at the Illinois Beach Resort in Zion, IL. Registration now open.


With Heart in Mind

Available now! Order


wwwfollow us on facebook

FOLLOW US ON:

Forward to a friend

Join our mailing list


Donations

The Mussar Institute depends on the generosity of supporters. Please consider making a donation to honor someone or to remember a loved one.

Thank you to our generous donors:

Membership

TMI Membership for 2015–2016 is now open. Support TMI and take advantage of special offerings for members. Click here for more information. 

Donations are gratefully accepted.

pushke


THE MUSSAR INSTITUTE

For further information on The Mussar Institute, visit www.MussarInstitute.org
Email address: info@mussarinstitute.org
Phone: 305-610-7260